Month: May 2019

Scientists in Germany have hit a new superconductivity milestone – achieving a resistance-free electrical current at the highest temperature yet: just 250 Kelvin, or -23 degrees Celsius (-9.4 degrees Fahrenheit). The work was led by Mikhail Eremets, a physicist at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, who set the previous high temperature record for superconductivity
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Larry is the best sleeper in America. He is 70 and happy. Be like Larry. May is Better Sleep Month, and seniors should be celebrating. According to a new survey by The Better Sleep Council, retired adults and the nation’s baby boomers are sleeping great. And the Silent Generation—people born between 1925 and 1945—are the
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It’s been almost exactly one year since US scientists reported a mysterious surge in ozone-destroying chemicals, known as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Banned in 1987 under the globally signed Montreal Protocol, there was only one explanation: somewhere out there, in an unknown location, someone must have gone rogue, setting back progress on the ozone hole by a
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PASADENA, Calif. – Olis Robotics, a company that offers software for mobile remote robots, sees many applications for its artificial intelligence to support internal and external space servicing, assembly, manufacturing and operational concepts,” Blaine Levedahl, Olis Robotics U.S. government programs director, said May 22 at the Space Tech Expo here. Olis Robotics announced its latest
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Sean Hunt and Gaurab Chakrabarti, cofounders of Solugen Solugen Houston-based chemical manufacturing startup Solugen, announced Wednesday that it has raised a $32 million series B round.  The company, which was cofounded by Forbes Under 30 alumni Gaurab Chakrabarti and Sean Hunt, will use to expand its manufacturing facilities. The round was led by Founders Fund,
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This article originally appeared in the May 6, 2019 issue of SpaceNews magazine. Some people see the proliferation of startups developing rocket engines as a sign of the space industry’s vibrancy. Jeff Greason calls it “f—ing insane.” “It’s a sign of the immaturity of the industry,” Greason, former XCOR Aerospace co-founder and chief executive, said
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You started out as just a few cells but developed into trillions of cells that make up all the different organs in your body. For this to happen, your cells have had to divide into two new cells that each include all the cellular components and DNA they need. To help scientists study this important
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PASADENA, Calif. — Despite a surge in Chinese launch activity and growth of commercial Chinese launch developers, executives with American companies said they’re not worried about potential competition with them. The issue of Chinese competition has become a particular concern in the last year for small launch vehicle developers. Several private Chinese companies are working
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