Month: June 2019

Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin Cawthron Institute scientist Mike Packer in algal growth room. Cawthron Institute A team at the Nelson Artificial Intelligence Institute has developed technology they claim can detect tiny algal cells in the ocean before they multiply to create toxic algal blooms. Toxic algal blooms, also know as ‘red tides’, are
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Researchers at Princeton released a new study on how many online shopping sites use coercive so-called “dark pattern” techniques to trick people into spending more money. “This is manipulating users into making decisions they wouldn’t otherwise make and buying stuff they don’t need,” Gunes Acar, a research associate at Princeton who helped run the study,
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JAKARTA, Indonesia — Indonesian satellite operator Pasifik Satelit Nusantara (PSN) plans to continue its ongoing fleet expansion with a new satellite carrying 300 gigabits per second of capacity by 2023.  Dani Indra Widjanarko, director of planning and development at PSN, said the company is still designing the satellite — which would increase its fleet size
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Humpback whales feed on fish—and microplastics—in Alaska. Getty Microplastics are found everywhere, from remote wilderness to the depths of the sea. They can alter growth of our agricultural crops. Recently, researchers Gloria Fackelmann and Dr. Simone Sommer of Ulm University conducted an extensive review covering how ingested microplastic causes an imbalance in the gut microbiomes of animals
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In the bewildering quagmire that is the gas between the stars, the Hubble Space Telescope has identified evidence of ionised buckminsterfullerene, the carbon molecule known colloquially as “buckyballs”. Containing 60 carbon atoms arranged in a soccer ball shape, buckminsterfullerene (C60) occurs naturally here on Earth – in soot. But in 2010, it was also detected in
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JAKARTA, Indonesia — When GapSat exited stealth mode in 2014, the company sought to match satellite operators in need of short-term capacity with underutilized satellites from other operators.  GapSat found, however, that too often satellite operators searching for extra capacity didn’t actually need to borrow an entire satellite.  “They would have to lease a satellite
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I spend a lot of time pointing out that weather and climate are different. I often use the analogy that “weather is your mood, and climate is your personality.” Scientists (and scientifically-literate people) are usually stunned by comments framing day-to-day weather variability as some type of litmus test for the validity of anthropogenic climate change.
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