Nature

Hiroshima survivor Setsuko Thurlow (pictured, centre, receiving the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons) has written to world leaders this week urging them to step up disarmament efforts.Credit: Lise Aserud/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock The start of August marks an inauspicious anniversary for science, that of the first — and, so
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It is 75 years since the United States dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6 and 9 August 1945, killing around 200,000 people. Since then, humanity has had to coexist with the massive destructive power of nuclear weapons. Although such weapons have not been used in wars since, they
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Klaus Fuchs was arrested for espionage in 1950.Credit: GL Archive/Alamy Atomic Spy: The Dark Lives of Klaus Fuchs Nancy Thorndike Greenspan Viking (2020) Klaus Fuchs is better remembered for his betrayal than for his science. The brilliant German theoretical physicist handed the Soviet Union secrets that allowed it to accelerate its cold-war work on a
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Credit: Getty A group of European funding agencies and research councils is calling for organizations to adopt new measures to evaluate researchers and grant proposals, expanding beyond conventional metrics such as publication records or previous grant success. The suggested measures include assessing a researcher’s output or grant proposal for its potential for economic and societal
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A longfin inshore squid hatchling treated with CRISPR gene editing lacks the spots of its untreated companion. Credit: K. Crawford et al./Curr. Biol. CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing 31 July 2020 The creation of spotless cephalopods hints that squid could make a good model organism for applying CRISPR to brain research. Researchers have used CRISPR–Cas9 genome-editing technology
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Chinese companies have made several vaccines that are currently being trialled. Credit: Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Chinese companies are at the forefront of global efforts to create a vaccine for the coronavirus, with more than half a dozen candidates in clinical development. Last week, Tianjin-based CanSino Biologics published results1 from an early-stage clinical trial showing that its
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Students in Abidjan, Côte D’Ivoire, graduate with a digital-sciences degree in November 2019.Credit: Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty I still recall my excitement when I started doing experiments during my master’s programme and saw a well-equipped laboratory for the first time. I adapted easily to the theoretical aspects of my course at the University of Orléans, France. But
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Raísa Vieira (right) is concerned about diversity losses among early-career researchers in Brazil.Credit: Raísa Vieira Years of slow improvement in diversity and inclusion in science could come undone because of the COVID-19 crisis. In a June letter to Nature Ecology and Evolution1, 19 researchers from around the world warned that job losses during the pandemic
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The CBETA accelerator at Cornell University, New York, is designed to recoup the energy it pours into making high-energy electron beams. Credit: Cornell University Particle physics 31 July 2020 Most linear accelerators are energy hogs, but a new model recovers waste energy that can be ploughed back into the system. Linear accelerators excel at speeding
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Cell lines Cell lines were purchased from ATCC and were not formally authenticated, but confirmation of expected gene expression patterns were performed for RNA-seq and eCLIP experiments. Cell lines were routinely tested for mycoplasma contamination (MycoAlert, Lonza). RNA-binding protein annotations and domains RBPs were chosen from a previously described list of 1,072 known RBPs, proteins
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This fossil trapped in amber was thought to be a dinosaur but is probably a lizard.Credit: Lida Xing World’s smallest dinosaur is probably a lizard A high-profile paper that reported what was thought to be the remains of the smallest-known bird-like dinosaur has been retracted. New evidence suggests that the specimen, trapped in amber nearly
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Researchers are questioning why Donald Trump chose to remove COVID-19 data management from the CDC and transfer it to the federal government.Credit: Tom Brenner/Reuters As deaths from COVID-19 approach 150,000 in the United States and cases continue to rise alarmingly in many regions of the country, there are strong signs that the government is suppressing
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