Nature

Bonobo mother Marie is engulfed by biological daughters Marina and Margaux (left and right), aged 5 and 2, and adopted daughter Flora (lower middle), aged almost 3. Credit: Nahoko Tokuyama Animal behaviour 18 March 2021 Bonobo mums open their arms to outsider orphans Two female bonobos adopted youngsters from another troop — an unprecedented behaviour
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Has the world hit peak COVID-19? It’s a question scientists are beginning to ask as global case figures tumble and mass vaccination efforts gather speed. But a plethora of new variants that threaten to circumvent vaccines and existing natural immunity mean it’s too soon to be sure, say researchers. “The early evidence is encouraging, but
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Listen to the latest science news, with Nick Petrić Howe and Shamini Bundell. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 In this episode: 00:43 AI Debater After thousands of years of human practise, it’s still not clear what makes a good argument. Despite this, researchers have been developing computer programs that can
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A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Stockholm Robert J. Lefkowitz with Randy Hall Pegasus (2021) Cardiologist-turned-biochemist, Robert Lefkowitz won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for showing how adrenaline works through stimulation of specific receptors, with huge implications for drug discovery. Yet he calls himself “an accidental scientist”, because he trained as a
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Taking responsibility for the way you behave towards others can improve your professional relationships.Credit: Misha Friedman/Getty The cognitive-intelligence quotient, known as IQ, is an important factor in determining your reasoning ability, but a high IQ score is not the whole story when it comes to thriving professionally (and personally). Another dimension of human intelligence, known
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Industries such as aviation do not have clear road maps for tackling carbon dioxide emissions.Credit: Aviation-Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Five years ago, the United Nations Paris climate agreement set a ceiling for global warming at well below 2 °C, ideally 1.5 °C relative to pre-industrial levels. World leaders also agreed to balance greenhouse-gas emissions
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The Amazon rainforest of French Guiana constantly buzzes and hums, but I keep my focus on the trees. In this picture, taken in November 2020 — the most recent time I was there — I’m walking through a dense forest at the Paracou research station near the coastal town of Kourou. I’m looking at drone
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Correction to: Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04738Published online 15 June 2006 In this Letter, there is an error in the analysis of data that affects some of the conclusions. The three main conclusions of the Letter were as follows. First, that the Heliconius heurippa wing pattern arose by hybridization between H. cydno cordula and H. m. melpomene, demonstrated
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Space scientists at Systems Labs, California, in 1957.Credit: J.R. Eyerman/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Some of scientists’ most rewarding moments come when we confront a hard problem or a difficult task. Solving a major methodological hurdle, designing an elegant experiment, making sense of a puzzling result, working on a new model or writing a paper or
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Pain signals are transmitted to the brain through neurons similar to these in the spinal cord.Credit: Jose Calvo/Science Photo Library A gene-silencing technique based on CRISPR can relieve pain in mice, according to a study1. Although the therapy is still a long way from being used in humans, scientists say it is a promising approach
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Antibodies attacking a coronavirus particle (illustration).Credit: Juan Gaertner/SPL/Alamy Two clinical trials suggest that specific antibody treatments can prevent deaths and hospitalizations among people with mild or moderate COVID-19 — particularly those who are at high risk of developing severe disease. One study found that an antibody against the coronavirus developed by Vir Biotechnology in San
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In this webcast from Nature Careers’ webinar programme, which is now available to view on demand, scientists describe their experiences of working from home and looking after children while laboratories and offices were closed during pandemic lockdowns. What advice do they have for staying healthy and productive? Anne-Laure Mahul Mellier, a neurobiologist at the Swiss
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Benjamin Thompson and Nidhi Subbaraman discuss the latest COVID-19 news. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been many open questions about how COVID-19 could impact pregnant people and their babies – confounded by a lack of data. But now, studies are finally starting
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Center of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Jaewoong Lee, Mark E. Robinson, Dewan Artadji, Teresa Sadras, Kadriye Nehir Cosgun, Lai N. Chan, Kohei Kume, Lars Klemm & Markus Müschen Department of Computational and Quantitative Medicine, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA Ning Ma & Nagarajan Vaidehi Department of Systems Biology, City of Hope
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